Jesse J. Anderson


You Are Not Lazy

Being lazy is a choice, not a trait.

It's easy to think lazy means a lack of motivation or strong willpower. The truth is, willpower has nothing to do with it.

When willpower falls short, you tell yourself damaging lies:

  • You think you are a failure.
  • You think you are broken.
  • You think you are lazy.

You are not lazy.

When execution fails to meet expectation, the true takeaway is that you wanted to do the right thing—you desired to take action! To be lazy, you must specifically decide that you do not want to take action.

Being lazy is choosing non-action, with intention.

We know that good intentions aren't enough—so what can be done to fix this broken connection between our goals and our reality?

We have to identify what is getting in our way and remove it.

You are not lazy.

There will be conditions in your life that drag you down and push you toward self-blame.

Mental health, physical health, and spiritual health can add significant burden to creating action.

For many years, I didn't know I had ADHD. My mental health burden was sabotaging my progress and I began to believe those who told me I was lazy.

I accepted it as part of my identity, even when it never felt true, I couldn't argue with the result.

Labels have strength. Accepting them as your identity will hold you back. To achieve change in your life, we must abandon those labels. We must claim our truth and move forward with self-compassion.

You are not lazy.