Jesse J. Anderson


How To Improve Your Zoom Camera Setup

Whenever I join a Zoom call with new people, I get asked about my camera setup. It becomes a free ice-breaker for new conversations.

It's not even my setup! Months ago, I asked a friend how his camera looked so good and then purchased all the same gear. No need to reinvent the wheel.

It's a very simple setup for under $1,000.

Sony a5100 ~$500

This is the main camera. Other dSLRs will work as well, but many overheat with longer video so you want to make sure to do your research. For a Zoom camera you don't want to have to worry about overheating.

Another advantage of the a5100 is the flip-up screen. You get a miniature confidence monitor you can check before joining a call.

Elgato Cam Link 4k ~$120

This is what converts the dSLR into a webcam. It's a bit expensive for what is essentially a glorified USB adapter. But it works with no fuss so I've been very happy with it.

Sigma f/1.4 30mm lens ~$250

This lens is where that magic bokeh effect happens. My office isn't very large, but the wide open aperture blurs out the background nicely and gives it that professional look.

Some crappy LED desk lamp ~$80

Nothing fancy—just a rectangle of light that I aim at my face. But it provides enough light to help my face stand out on camera and provide even more separation from the background.

Whenever I join a Zoom call with new people, I get asked about my camera setup. It becomes a free ice-breaker for new conversations.